HADRIAN AND THE TRIUMPH OF ROME

ANTHONY EVERITT
329pp ILLUS 2009 OUT OF PRINT G328

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£14.95

Description
The biographer of Augustus and Cicero here portrays a man he deems arguably the most successful of Rome's rulers. Born in 76 AD, Hadrian lived through and ruled during a tempestuous era, a time when the Colosseum was opened to the public and Pompeii was buried under a mountain of ash, and brought a century of disorder and costly warfare to a peaceful conclusion. What distinguished Hadrian's rule, according to Everitt, were two accomplishments: he ended Rome's untenable territorial expansion and fortified her boundaries, and he effectively 'Hellenised' Rome by anointing Athens the empire's cultural centre, making Greek learning and art prominent in Roman life. He also covers Hadrian's war against the Jews and illuminates the emperor's private life, describing his unhappy marriage to Sabina and his enduring yet doomed relationship with Antinous, a beautiful young Bithynian man.